American School of Classical Studies Concludes 2015 Season

The American School of Classical Studies Excavations at Corinth announced on Friday the conclusion to their 2015 season which focused this season on continuing excavation in the Frankish quarters, conservation of the Good Luck mosaic, excavation in the area of South Stoa, 3D scans of the Fountain of Peirene, among others. Here’s the news release from Friday:

Our 2015 excavation season at Corinth has come to a successful end as the third session supervisors, Emilio Rodriguez-Alvarez, Phil Katz, and Anna Marie Sitz, wrap up their final reports over the next week. Evidence for the construction date of the Church in the Frankish area will be bolstered by the large numbers of coins retrieved. Elina Salminen excavated and studied burials from the area. Larkin Kennedy acted as the site supervisor and Rossana Valente assisted in the pottery sheds. Conservation and anastylosis also continue in the Frankish area. In the Agonotheteion of the South Stoa excavation reached bedrock in preparation for the resetting of the Eutychia mosaic. Conservation work in the South Stoa, generously funded by the Stockman Family Foundation, continues. Currently Colin Wallace is using photogrammetry to record the 37 mosaic panels. Also during the final session we received a visit from Scott Lee and Matthew Strahan of Cyark who scanned the fountain of Peirene in 3D. Thus, 102 years after Carl Blegan and Emerson Swift slid through the wet muddy tunnels with compass, measuring rod, and candles floating on boards, this old fountain was recorded by archaeologists in yet another fashion.

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“Bridge of the Untiring Sea”: Contents

Working through page proofs today for my contribution to the forthcoming Isthmus collection. I have transcribed below the table of contents for the volume, which highlights a chronological arrangement: two essays on the Bronze Age, about 7 essays on the archaic to Hellenistic sanctuary, and 7 essays on the Roman and late Antique Isthmus. Some 13 of the 17 essays deal specifically with Isthmia. While some of the essays explore broader historical issues, this is solid archaeological volume with its strong emphasis on classes of artifacts and particular sites.

I’ll add the bibliography to the Corinthian Studies library in Zotero today. The other front matter for the volume includes new maps of the Isthmus, new authoritative plans of Isthmia, about 160 photos and illustrations, and 6 tables. Look for this volume in print in August or September.

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Introduction (Elizabeth R. Gebhard and Τimothy E. Gregory)

Chapter 1. An Early Mycenaean Habitation Site at Kyras Vrysi (Eleni Balomenou and Vasili Tassinos)

Chapter 2. The Settlement at Kalamianos: Bronze Age Small Worlds and the Saronic Coast of the Southeastern Corinthia (Thomas F. Tartaron)

Chapter 3. The Archaic Temple of Poseidon: Problems of Design and Invention (Frederick P. Hemans)

Chapter 4. The Domestic Architecture of the Rachi Settlement at Isthmia (Virginia R. Anderson-Stojanović)

Chapter 5. City, Sanctuary, and Feast: Dining Vessels from the Archaic Reservoir in the Sanctuary of Poseidon (Martha K. Risser)

Chapter 6. The Temple Deposit at Isthmia and the Dating of Archaic and Early Classical Greek Coins (Liane Houghtalin)

Chapter 7. Riding for Poseidon: Terracotta Figurines from the Sanctuary of Poseidon (Arne Thomsen)

Chapter 8. The Chigi Painter at Isthmia? (K. W. Arafat)

Chapter 9. Arms from the Age of Philip and Alexander at Broneer’s West Foundation near Isthmia (A. H. Jackson)

Chapter 10. New Sculptures from the Isthmian Palaimonion (Mary C. Sturgeon)

Chapter 11. Agonistic Festivals, Victors, and Officials in the Time of Nero: An Inscribed Herm from the Gymnasium Area of Corinth (James Wiseman)

Chapter 12. Roman Baths at Isthmia and Sanctuary Baths in Greece (Fikret K.Yegül)

Chapter 13. The Roman Buildings East of the Temple of Poseidon on the Isthmus (Steven J. R. Ellis and Eric E. Poehler)

Chapter 14. Corinthian Suburbia: Patterns of Roman Settlement on the Isthmus (David K. Pettegrew)

Chapter 15. Work Teams on the Isthmian Fortress and the Development of a Later Roman Architectural Aesthetic (Jon M. Frey)

Chapter 16. Epigraphy, Liturgy, and Imperial Policy on the Justinianic Isthmus (William R. Caraher)

Chapter 17. Circular Lamps in the Late Antique Peloponnese (Birgitta Lindros Wohl)

“The Bridge of the Untiring Sea”. A New Book about the Isthmus

The closest I came to the Corinthia this year was a flight over the Isthmus en route to JFK from Athens. A very busy spring semester led directly to a productive field and museum season of the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project in May-early June. Now that I’m back in the US and the summer stretches before me, I have a little more time to release some Corinthiaka updates, news items, and reviews.

One important update is that the long-awaited book titled “The Bridge of the Untiring Sea”: The Corinthian Isthmus from Prehistory to Late Antiquity, has now entered proof stage and is scheduled for publication in late August. Edited by Elizabeth R. Gebhard and Timothy E. Gregory, this work publishes a conference held in 2007 at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens to celebrate 50 years of archaeological work at Isthmia and across the broader Isthmus. Here’s the book cover and description:

Pindar’s metaphor of the Isthmus as a bridge spanning two seas encapsulates the essence of the place and gives a fitting title for this volume of essays on the history and archaeology of the area. The Isthmus, best known for the panhellenic sanctuary of Poseidon, attracted travelers both before and after Pausanias’s visit in the 2nd century A.D., but only toward the end of the 19th century were the ruins investigated and, after another half century, finally systematically excavated. More recently, archaeologists have surveyed the territory beyond the sanctuary, compiling evidence for a varied picture of activity on the wider Isthmus and the eastern Corinthia. The 17 essays in this book celebrate 55 years of research on the Isthmus and provide a comprehensive overview of the state of our knowledge. Topics include an early Mycenaean habitation site at Kyras Vrysi; the settlement at Kalamianos; the Archaic Temple of Poseidon; domestic architecture of the Rachi settlement; dining vessels from the Sanctuary of Poseidon; the Temple Deposit at Isthmia and the dating of Archaic and early Classical Greek coins; terracotta figurines from the Sanctuary of Poseidon; the Chigi Painter; arms from the age of Philip and Alexander at Broneer’s West Foundation on the road to Corinth; new sculptures from the Isthmian Palaimonion; an inscribed herm from the Gymnasium-Bath complex of Corinth; Roman baths at Isthmia and sanctuary baths in Greece; Roman buildings east of the Temple of Poseidon; patterns of settlement and land use on the Roman Isthmus; epigraphy, liturgy, and Imperial policy on the Justinianic Isthmus; and circular lamps in the Late Antique Peloponnese.

I’m jazzed to see this volume in print. I have not seen any of these pieces other my own (obviously!) and Caraher’s piece on the Justinianic Isthmus. Most of the essays in the volume naturally focus on areas where the most fieldwork has occurred, especially in and around the Panhellenic sanctuary at Isthmia. A few consider the broader landscape of the eastern Corinthia including even places that are not on the Isthmus such as Kalamianos in the southeast Corinthia. 

Here’s the publication page for the book at the ASCSA website. The book is available for pre-ordering at Oxbow and Amazon, among other places.