Pleiades Retooled

Last month I noted that the Pleiades Gazetteer received a major digital humanities implementation grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to make substantive changes to the project’s infrastructure. Tom Elliot has written a little more about how the grant will extend and improve the project’s functionality. Here’s the relevant section from the press release:

Over the next three years, ISAW will use these funds to retool the software that now underpins Pleiades to provide consistently faster performance, to make it easy to use with tablet and mobile devices, and to accelerate  and enable support for the broader ancient and early medieval worlds. Additional enhancements will make it easier for us to expand Pleiades content in a manner consistent with ISAW’s connective and comparative mission: extending cultural and geographic coverage to the Ancient Near East and Central Asia and temporal coverage through the Byzantine and Early Islamic Empires. The software upgrades will build on existing collaborations with the Pelagios network and the Duke Collaboratory for Classics Computing. Data sharing agreements with The Syriac Gazetteeral-Thurayyā GazetteerThe Early Islamic Empire at Work project, and other partners will reinforce and multiply the content creation work of the volunteer community of scholars, students, and enthusiasts who publish their geographic scholarship through Pleiades.Pleiades Coverage

The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (eds. Eidinow and Kindt)

Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek ReligionAnother exciting new Oxford handbook is scheduled for publication next month. The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, edited by Esther Eidinow and Julia Kindt, offers a broad overview of Greek religion from archaic to Hellenistic times, including numerous case studies and some 43 chapters on topics ranging from belief and practice to the deities, daimonic powers, the afterlife, sacrifice, and healing. Google Books has already scanned a sample that suggests plentiful Corinthiaka on topics such as the debate over sacred prostitution at Corinth, the city treasury at Delphi, particular cults, sanctuaries, and divine epiphanies.  But the book’s general content by itself will offer state-of-the-field syntheses of a host of subjects related to ancient religion.

The publisher page describes the book in this way:

This handbook offers a comprehensive overview of scholarship in ancient Greek religion, from the Archaic to the Hellenistic periods. It presents not only key information, but also explores the ways in which such information is gathered and the different approaches that have shaped the area. In doing so, the volume provides a crucial research and orientation tool for students of the ancient world, and also makes a vital contribution to the key debates surrounding the conceptualization of ancient Greek religion.

The handbook’s initial chapters lay out the key dimensions of ancient Greek religion, approaches to evidence, and the representations of myths. The following chapters discuss the continuities and differences between religious practices in different cultures, including Egypt, the Near East, the Black Sea, and Bactria and India. The range of contributions emphasizes the diversity of relationships between mortals and the supernatural – in all their manifestations, across, between, and beyond ancient Greek cultures – and draws attention to religious activities as dynamic, highlighting how they changed over time, place, and context.

And the table of contents suggests wide-ranging approaches:

List of Figures
Abbreviations and Conventions
List of Contributors

Introduction Esther Eidinow and Julia Kindt

Part 1: What is Ancient Greek Religion?
1. Unity vs. Diversity?, Robin Osborne
2. Belief vs. Practice?, Tom Harrison
3. Old vs. New?, Emily Kearns
4. Many vs. One?, Vinciane Pirenne Delforge and Gabriella Pironti

Part 2: Types of Evidence
5. Visual Evidence, Milette Gaifman
6. Literary Evidence: Prose, Hannah Willey
7. Literary Evidence: Poetry, Renaud Gagne
8. Epigraphic Evidence, Claire Taylor
9. Material Evidence, Caitlin E. Barrett
10. Papyrology, David Martinez

Part 3: Myths? Contexts and Representations
11. Epic, Richard Martin
12. Art and Imagery, Tanja Scheer
13. Drama, Claude Calame
14. History, Robert Fowler
15. Philosophy, Rick Benitez and Harold Tarrant

Part 4: Where?
16. Temples and Sanctuaries, Mike Scott
17. Households, Families, and Women, Matt Dillon
18. Religion in Communities, Kostas Vlassopoulos
19. Regional Religious Groups, Amphictionies, and Other Leagues, Christy Constantakopoulou

Part 5: How?
20. Religious Expertise, Mike Flower
21. New Gods, Ralph Anderson
22. Impiety, Hugh Bowden
23. ‘Sacred Law’, Andrej Petrovic

Part 6: Who?
24. Gods: Olympian or Chthonic, Susan Deacy
25. Gods: Origins, Carolina Lopez-Ruiz
26. Heroes: Living or Dead?, Gunnel Ekroth
27. Dead or Alive?, Emanuel Voutiras
28. Daimonic Power, Giulia Sfameni Gasparro
29. Deification: Gods or Men?, Ivana Petrovic

Part 7: What?
30. Prayer and Curse, Henk Versnel
31. Sacrifice, Fred Naiden
32. Oracles and Divination, Sarah Iles Johnston
33. Epiphany, Verity Platt
34. Healing, Fritz Graf

Part 8: When?
35. From Birth to Death: Life-changing Rituals, Sarah Hitch
36. Ritual Cycles: Calendars and Festivals, Jan-Matheiu Carbon
37. Imagining the After-Life, Radcliffe Edmonds III

Part 9: Beyond?
38. Magna Graecia (South Italy and Sicily), Gillian Shepherd
39. The Northern Black Sea: The Case of the Bosporan Kingdom, Maya Muratov
40. The Ancient Near East, Jan Bremmer
41. Greco-Egyptian Religion, Kathrin Kleibl
42. Bactria and India, Rachael Mairs
43. China and Greece: Comparisons and Insights, Lisa Raphals
Index

 

People Under Power: Early Christian and Jewish Responses (Lebahn and Lehtipuu)

This new book edited by Labahn and Lehtipuu looks broadly relevant to the study of Judaism and early Christianity at Corinth and the Corinthian correspondence with all its emphasis on power and weakness:

Labahn, Michael, and Outi Lehtipuu, eds. People under Power: Early Jewish and Christian Responses to the Roman Power Empire. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2015.

The book, which will be out next month, has chapters devoted to Jewish communities under empire, the New Testament within the context of empire, and early Christian texts in light of imperial ideologies.

 

According to the publisher page, “This volume presents a batch of incisive new essays on the relationship between Roman imperial power and ideology and Christian and Jewish life and thought within the empire. Employing diverse methodologies that include historical criticism, rhetorical criticism, postcolonial criticism, and social historical studies, the contributors offer fresh perspectives on a question that is crucial for our understanding not only of the late Roman Empire, but also of the growth and change of Christianity and Judaism in the imperial period.”

 

I’ve transcribed the Table of Contents below (with a more readable PDF version here)

Table of Contents: 

Introduction: Christians, Jews, and Roman Power (Outi Lehtipuu & Michael Labahn)

Part I Jewish Communities in the Shadows of the Empire

“The Kittim and Hints of Hybridity in the Dead Sea Scrolls” (George J. Brooke, University of Manchester)

“The Politics of Exclusion: Expulsions of Jews and Others from Rome” (Birgit van der Lans, University of Groningen)

“”Μεμορια Iudati patiri”: Some Notes to the Study of the Beginnings of Jewish Presence in Roman Pannonia” (Nóra Dávid, University of Vienna)

Part II Contextualizing New Testament Texts with the Empire

“Imperial Politics in Paul: Scholarly Phantom or Actual Textual Phenomenon?” (Anders Klostergaard Petersen, University of Aarhus)

“Das Markusevangelium – eine ideologie- und imperiumskritische Schrift? Ein Blick in die Auslegungsgeschichte” (Martin Meiser, Universität des Saarlandes)

“„Ein Beispiel habe ich euch gegeben…“ (Joh 13,15): Die Diakonie Jesu und die Diakonie der Christen in der johanneischen Fußwaschungserzählung als Konterkarierung römischer Alltagskultur” (Klaus Scholtissek, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena)

Part III Imperial Ideology and Other Early Christian Texts

“The Shepherd of Hermas and the Roman Empire” (Mark R. C. Grundeken, Catholic University of Leuven)

“Noble Death or Death Cult? Pagan Criticism of Early Christian Martyrdom” (Paul Middleton, University of Chester)

“Nero Redivivus as a Subject of Early Christian Arcane Teaching” (Marco Frenschkowski, University of Leipzig)

The Best Pictures of Ancient Corinth

I will be experimenting this fall with a new series highlighting images of Corinth, the Corinthia, and the idea of Corinth in the ancient and modern period. The series will actually continue and develop an idea explored through previous posts (categorized Corinth in the Mind) that offered images of Corinth and Corinthian-inspired places and things.

This week’s comes from the company /website Look and Learn History Picture Library, which sells prints of original artwork produced by children’s illustrators. Three great images of ancient Corinth in its landscapeLookandlearn1Lookandlearn2.

Corinthiaka

Every month I sort through hundreds of google alerts, scholar alerts, academia notices, book review sites, and other social media in an attempt to find a few valuable bits to pass along via this site. I ignore the vast majority of hits that enter my inbox, store away those that I plan to develop into their own stories, and then release the ephemera (or those I fail to convert to stories) via these Corinthiaka posts. Here are a few from the last month–a small selection of the news, stories, and blogs about the Corinthia.

UnionpediaArchaeology and Classics:

New Testament:

Modern Greece: