On Kalamianos in the Southeast Corinthia

Bill Caraher has a short review of a recent article on the Bronze Age site of Kalamianos at Archaeology of the Mediterranean World. Bill reviews Daniel Pullen’s recent article (“The Life and Death of a Mycenaean Port Town: Kalamianos on the Saronic Gulf”) in the Journal of Maritime Archaeology and places it in a broader scholarly context about the driving forces of ancient trade.

Here’s a snippet of the review:

Two interesting articles landed on my desk over the last few days. D. Pullen’s report in the Journal of Maritime Archaeology on the site of Kalamianos in the the Korinthia and Justin Leidwanger’s article in Journal of Roman Archaeology documented a 2nd-3rd century shipwreck at the site of Fig Tree Bay on Cyprus.

Pullen argues that the impressive coastal site of Kalamianos represented interest of Mycenae in establishing a harbor on the Saronic Gulf in the Late Bronze Age. Situated adjacent to the site of Kolonna on Aigina and perhaps representing the decline in that polity’s political and military influence in the area, Kalamianos was a substantial and apparently urbanized (ing?) site situated at a peninsula that provided two relatively secure anchorages….

Read the rest here.

Related:

Corinthian Scholarship Monthly (October 2013)

Here’s the round-up of new Corinthiaka scholarship for the month of October. Happy Reading. You can also find these entries at the Corinthian Studies Group Library Page in Zotero.

Bronze Age

Early Iron Age-Hellenistic

Roman and Late Antique

New Testament and Early Christian

  • Brown, Alexandra R. “Creation, Gender, and Identity in (New) Cosmic Perspective: 1 Corinthians 11:2-16.” In The Unrelenting God: Essays on God’s Action in Scripture in Honor of Beverly Roberts Gaventa, edited by David J. Downs and Matthew L. Skinner, 172–193. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=uuBgAQAAQBAJ.
  • Downing, F. Gerald. Order and (Dis)order in the First Christian Century: A General Survey of Attitudes. BRILL, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=PfeZAAAAQBAJ
  • Eastman, Susan Grove. “Ashes on the Frontal Lobe: Cognitive Dissonance and Cruciform Cognition in 2 Corinthians.” In The Unrelenting God: Essays on God’s Action in Scripture in Honor of Beverly Roberts Gaventa, edited by David J. Downs and Matthew L. Skinner, 194–207. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=uuBgAQAAQBAJ
  • Schellenberg, Ryan S. Rethinking Paul’s Rhetorical Education: Comparative Rhetoric and 2 Corinthians 10–13. Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=8TRXAQAAQBAJ
  • Van den Hoek, Annewies. “The Saga of Peter and Paul: Emblems of Catholic Identity in Christian Literature and Art.” In Pottery, Pavements, and Paradise: Iconographic and Textual Studies on Late Antiquity, edited by Annewies van den Hoek and John Joseph Herrmann, 301–326. BRILL, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=RcJSAQAAQBAJ

Diachronic

  • Hadler, H., A. Vött, B. Koster, M. Mathes-Schmidt, T. Mattern, K. Ntageretzis, K. Reicherter, and T. Willershäuser. “Multiple late-Holocene Tsunami Landfall in the Eastern Gulf of Corinth Recorded in the Palaeotsunami Geo-archive at Lechaion, Harbour of Ancient Corinth” (2013).
  • Williams, Charles K., II. “Corinth, 2011: Investigation of the West Hall of the Theater.” Hesperia: The Journal of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens 82, no. 3 (2013): 487–549. doi:10.2972/hesperia.82.3.0487.

Archaeological Research at Corinth – Summer 2012

The ASCSA website carries a recent report by Ioulia Tzonou-Herbst summarizing archaeological work in Corinth and the region last summer. The essay offers a snapshot of a wide range of research and programs currently being carried out by archaeologists, art historians, and historians:  the Sanctuary of Demeter and Kore, the Gymnasium, Fountain of the Lamps, Theater, Captives Façade, Frankish pottery, Hellenistic and Roman ceramics, Late Bronze Age stirrup jars, Roman portrait sculpture, early 20th century architectural drawings, Perachora topography, Isthmia, digital archaeology, and educational programs.

Here’s the opening:

“This past summer was hot in Corinth, the hottest I remember since I arrived in 2001. Summers are busy and fascinating, full of discoveries. After the excavations finish at the end of June, the hostel is emptied out and we say our goodbyes to the Regular Member excavators. Their stories of digging are added to the long, long history of generations of excavators. The rooms are filled once again, with a different crew this time. Starting July 1, a wise and stimulating group of people gather in Corinth: professors and researchers who dug different parts of the site come back to make sense of their discoveries.

Our days are spent working in the museum. The short working hours of the museum this year put pressure on resident scholars to work straight through lunch, ‘doing the Mary’ and having a late lunch, which they considered a sacrifice that would please Demeter. Plenty of study and discussion took place in the afternoons in Hill House library and into ouzo time on the terrace overlooking the Corinthian Gulf.”

Read the rest here.

Corinthian Scholarship Monthly (November 2012)

Good Monday morning to you. Here is the latest body of scholarship that went digital last month and came to my attention. If you know of material that should be on the list, feel free to send via email or comment to this post. All of these entries have been added to the Corinthian Studies Digital Library (for info about the library, see this page).

Diachronic

Archibald, Zosia. “Archaeology in Greece, 2011–2012.” Archaeological Reports 58 (2012): 1–121. http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8750918

Archaic-Hellenistic

Hasaki, Eleni. “Craft Apprenticeship in Ancient Greece: Reaching Beyond the Masters.” In Archaeology and Apprenticeship: Body Knowledge, Identity, and Communities of Practice, edited by Willeke Wendrich, 171–202. University of Arizona Press, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=lang_en&id=stwd7aA3QLEC.

Scahill, D. “The South Stoa at Corinth: Design, Construction and Function of the Greek Phase”. PhD Thesis, University of Bath, 2012. http://opus.bath.ac.uk/32294/

Roman

Laurence, Karen A. “Roman Infrastructural Changes to Greek Sanctuaries and Games: Panhellenism in the Roman Empire, Formations of New Identities.” PhD Thesis, University of Michigan, 2012. http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/handle/2027.42/93878.

Medieval

Brown, Amelia R. “Medieval Pilgrimage to Corinth and Southern Greece.” HEROM: Journal on Hellenistic and Roman Material Culture 1 (2012). http://upers.kuleuven.be/en/titel/9789058679284

New Testament

Anderson, R. Dean. “Progymnastic Love.” In Christian Origins and Greco-Roman Culture: Social and Literary Contexts for the New Testament, edited by Stanley E. Porter and Andrew W. Pitts, 1:551–560. Leiden: Brill, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=Ts6ONz6oF0YC.

Coutsoumpos, Panayotis. “Paul, the Corinthians’ Meal, and the Social Context.” In Paul and His Social Relations, edited by Stanley E. Porter and Christopher D. Land, 285–300. BRILL, 2012. http://books.google.com/books?id=l93f7HBMswQC.

Elliott, Neil. “Diagnosing an Allergic Reaction: The Avoidance of Marx in Pauline Scholarship.” The Bible and Critical Theory 8, no. 2 (2012). http://bibleandcriticaltheory.org/index.php/bct/article/viewFile/528/471.

Folarin, George O., and Stephen O. Afolabi. “Christ Apostolic Church Women in Dialogue with 1 Corinthians 14:34-36.” Verbum Et Ecclesia 33, no. 1 (2012). http://www.ve.org.za/index.php/VE/article/view/731.

Harrison, James R. “The Imitation of the ‘Great Man’ in Antiquity: Paul’s Inversion of a Cultural Icon.” In Christian Origins and Greco-Roman Culture: Social and Literary Contexts for the New Testament, edited by Stanley E. Porter and Andrew W. Pitts, 1:214–254. Leiden: Brill, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=Ts6ONz6oF0YC.

Kuwornu-Adjaottor, J.E.T. “Spiritual Gifts, Spiritual Persons, Or Spiritually-Gifted Persons?: A Creative Translation of Twon Pneumatikwon in 1 Corinthians 12:1A.” Neotestamentica 46, no. 2 (2012): 260–273.  http://dspace.knust.edu.gh:8080/jspui/handle/123456789/4601 

Land, Christopher D. “‘We Put No Stumbling Block in Anyone’s Path, so That Our Ministry Will Not Be Discredited’: Paul’s Response to an Idol Food Inquiry in 1 Corinthians 8:1-13.” In Paul and His Social Relations, edited by Stanley E. Porter and Christopher D. Land, 229–284. BRILL, 2012. http://books.google.com/books?id=l93f7HBMswQC.

Lim, Sung Uk. “The Political Economy of Eating Idol Meat: Practice, Structure, and Subversion in 1 Corinthians 8 Through the Sociological Lens of Pierre Bourdieu.” Horizons in Biblical Theology 34, no. 2 (2012): 155–172.  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/brill/hbl/2012/00000034/00000002/art00004 

Moss, Candida R. “Christly Possession and Weakened Bodies: Reconsideration of the Function of Paul’s Thorn in the Flesh (2 Cor. 12:7–10).” Journal of Religion, Disability & Health 16, no. 4 (2012): 319–333. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15228967.2012.731987

Plummer, Robert L., and John Mark Terry, eds. Paul’s Missionary Methods: In His Time and Ours. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=6oOVdZUPLGQC.

Porter, Stanley E. “How Do We Define Pauline Social Relations?” In Paul and His Social Relations, edited by Stanley E. Porter and Christopher D. Land, 7–34. BRILL, 2012. http://books.google.com/books?id=l93f7HBMswQC.

Rogers, Guy MacLean. The Mysteries of Artemis of Ephesos: Cult, Polis, and Change in the Graeco-Roman World. Yale University Press, 2012. http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=lang_en&id=CayRIL1ot7cC.

Stenschke, Christoph. “The Significance and Function of References to Christians in the Pauline Literature.” In Paul and His Social Relations, edited by Stanley E. Porter and Christopher D. Land, 185–228. BRILL, 2012. http://books.google.com/books?id=l93f7HBMswQC.

Welborn, Larry L. “Towards Structural Marxism as a Hermeneutic of Early Christian Literature, Illustrated by Reference to Paul’s Spectacle Metaphor in 1 Corinthians 15:30-32.” The Bible and Critical Theory 8, no. 2 (2012). http://bibleandcriticaltheory.org/index.php/bct/article/viewFile/496/469.

Mycenaean necropolis discovered near Aigio

Not in the Corinthia but close.

An archaeological team associated with the University of Udine has announced their discovery of a Mycenaean necropolis near Aigio, a town on the coast of the Corinthian Gulf about 50 miles west of Ancient Corinth.

You can read about the discovery here: Archeologia, l’Università di Udine scopre una necropoli micenea di 3.500 anni fa

Thanks to Tom Henderson for sending the link.