“Bridge of the Untiring Sea”: Contents

Working through page proofs today for my contribution to the forthcoming Isthmus collection. I have transcribed below the table of contents for the volume, which highlights a chronological arrangement: two essays on the Bronze Age, about 7 essays on the archaic to Hellenistic sanctuary, and 7 essays on the Roman and late Antique Isthmus. Some 13 of the 17 essays deal specifically with Isthmia. While some of the essays explore broader historical issues, this is solid archaeological volume with its strong emphasis on classes of artifacts and particular sites.

I’ll add the bibliography to the Corinthian Studies library in Zotero today. The other front matter for the volume includes new maps of the Isthmus, new authoritative plans of Isthmia, about 160 photos and illustrations, and 6 tables. Look for this volume in print in August or September.

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Introduction (Elizabeth R. Gebhard and Τimothy E. Gregory)

Chapter 1. An Early Mycenaean Habitation Site at Kyras Vrysi (Eleni Balomenou and Vasili Tassinos)

Chapter 2. The Settlement at Kalamianos: Bronze Age Small Worlds and the Saronic Coast of the Southeastern Corinthia (Thomas F. Tartaron)

Chapter 3. The Archaic Temple of Poseidon: Problems of Design and Invention (Frederick P. Hemans)

Chapter 4. The Domestic Architecture of the Rachi Settlement at Isthmia (Virginia R. Anderson-Stojanović)

Chapter 5. City, Sanctuary, and Feast: Dining Vessels from the Archaic Reservoir in the Sanctuary of Poseidon (Martha K. Risser)

Chapter 6. The Temple Deposit at Isthmia and the Dating of Archaic and Early Classical Greek Coins (Liane Houghtalin)

Chapter 7. Riding for Poseidon: Terracotta Figurines from the Sanctuary of Poseidon (Arne Thomsen)

Chapter 8. The Chigi Painter at Isthmia? (K. W. Arafat)

Chapter 9. Arms from the Age of Philip and Alexander at Broneer’s West Foundation near Isthmia (A. H. Jackson)

Chapter 10. New Sculptures from the Isthmian Palaimonion (Mary C. Sturgeon)

Chapter 11. Agonistic Festivals, Victors, and Officials in the Time of Nero: An Inscribed Herm from the Gymnasium Area of Corinth (James Wiseman)

Chapter 12. Roman Baths at Isthmia and Sanctuary Baths in Greece (Fikret K.Yegül)

Chapter 13. The Roman Buildings East of the Temple of Poseidon on the Isthmus (Steven J. R. Ellis and Eric E. Poehler)

Chapter 14. Corinthian Suburbia: Patterns of Roman Settlement on the Isthmus (David K. Pettegrew)

Chapter 15. Work Teams on the Isthmian Fortress and the Development of a Later Roman Architectural Aesthetic (Jon M. Frey)

Chapter 16. Epigraphy, Liturgy, and Imperial Policy on the Justinianic Isthmus (William R. Caraher)

Chapter 17. Circular Lamps in the Late Antique Peloponnese (Birgitta Lindros Wohl)

2013-2014 Publications in Corinthian Studies: New Testament, Christianity, and Judaism

This is the fourth and final post in a series of bibliographic releases of new Corinthian scholarship published or digitized in 2013-2014. See this post last last Monday for further information about the sources of this bibliography and instructions for accessing the Zotero database. For earlier releases, see these posts:

Today’s list presents scholarship published or digitized in 2013 and 2014 related in some way to the subjects of Christianity, Judaism, and early Christianity. This includes some scholarship on the Hellenistic and early Roman “backgrounds” of Christianity and Judaism but most of this material focus directly on questions of religion.

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I have divided these reports by year to keep them manageable. Download the PDFs by right clicking on these link:

I generated these reports through Zotero tags and searches, and there are undoubtedly missing entries as well as false positives. For best results, visit the Zotero library or download the RIS file into your bibliographic program.

If you see references missing from the list, please send to corinthianmatters@gmail.com

2013-2014 Publications in Corinthian Studies: Byzantine-Modern Periods

This is the third in a series of bibliographic posts related to Corinthian scholarship published or digitized in 2013-2014:

  • See Monday’s post for further information about the sources of this bibliography
  • See  Tuesday’s post for Prehistoric-Hellenistic period
  • See Wednesday’s post for the Roman era

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This list contains new scholarship broadly related to the Corinthia in the following periods:

  • Late Antiquity
  • Byzantine
  • Frankish
  • Venetian
  • Ottoman
  • Modern

Download the PDF by right clicking on this link:

If you see references missing from the list, please send to corinthianmatters@gmail.com

We will complete the series next week with New Testament and Religion.

2013-2014 Publications in Corinthian Studies: Roman Period

This is the second in a series of bibliographic posts related to Corinthian scholarship published, uploaded, or digitized in 2013-2014.

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Today’s report contains new scholarship broadly related to the Corinthia in the Roman and Late Antique periods, but not articles and books related to the New Testament (which we will post separately next week).

Download the PDF by right clicking on this link:

2013-2014 Publications in Corinthian Studies: Prehistoric-Hellenistic Periods

This is the first in a series of bibliographic posts related to Corinthian scholarship published or digitized in 2013-2014. See yesterday’s post for further information about the sources of this bibliography. I have used Zotero’s Report feature to export bibliography to PDF so that the listing includes URLs and abstracts (when available).

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This list is certainly not exhaustive, but it does contain a good collection of new scholarship broadly related to the Corinthia in the following periods.

  • Neolithic
  • Bronze Age
  • Geometric
  • Archaic
  • Classical
  • Hellenistic

Download the PDF by right clicking on this link:

If you see references missing from the list, please send to corinthianmatters@gmail.com

Corinthian Studies Library, Version 2.0 (RIS)

As it’s a national day of service here in the U.S.A., I’m going to release this little gift of bibliography to those of you who follow Corinthian Studies. Now I realize this isn’t quite the same as going to clean up the city park, but I always hope there’s some basic value for others in maintaining this up-to-date bibliography.

A couple of years ago, I released the first version of an RIS library file (CorinthianStudies_v.1_10-10-12)  importable to Zotero, EndNote, or RefWorks. As this page describes, that bibliography contained 1,535 items at that time. Since then, the library has grown substantially as I have added material along the way and worked systematically to add items from major collections like OCLC WorldCat. I’m grateful for willing and able students like Rachel Carey, history major at Messiah College, who has been building the collection over the last two weeks. As of this morning, the library has grown to 2,448 entries. I am planning on working with a student or two in the next couple of months to expand the collection and improve it in different ways. When / If that happens, I will release a subsequent version. In the meantime, download the new version (2.0) here: CorinthianStudies_v.2_1-16-15.ris

The new RIS includes references from:

1. ARCHAEOLOGY COLLECTIONS: All of the entries from the bibliography of Corinth XX (2003), the Isthmia Library document (no longer online), and Corinthia-related references from the forthcoming Hesperia supplement on the Isthmus of Corinth.

2. PROJECTS: The publications of the Corinth Computer Project, Eastern Korinthia Survey, OSU Excavations at Isthmia, University of Chicago Excavations at Isthmia, Saronic Harbors Archaeological Project, and Kenchreai Cemetery Project.

3. NEW TESTAMENT and RELIGION: All articles published in three recent works related to archaeology, history, religion, and the New Testament: Urban Religion in Roman Corinth (2005), Corinth in Context (2010), and Corinth in Contrast (2013), as well as relevant Corinthia bibliography in the first two of those books. Material from a number of commentaries of 1 and 2 Corinthians is also included.

4. CORINTHIAN MATTERS: All Corinthianmatters bibliography collected on the Corinthianmatters website since 2010.

5. A JSTOR search on keywords Corinth, Corinthia*, Kenchreai/Cenchreae, Lechaion/Lechaum, and Isthmia/Isthmus, from 1800-2012.

6. WORLDCAT: A WorldCat search on keywords Corinth, Corinthia*, Kenchreai/Cenchreae, Lechaion/Lechaum, and Isthmia/Isthmus for 2010, 2011, 2013, and 2014.

The best way to access the full bibliographic metadata from this library, including URL addresses, full bibliographic data, and abstracts, is to view the RIS file through a bibliographic software program like Zotero, which is free. You’ll get more search power though software, which mines fields (e.g., the abstracts) that the online version does not.

If you don’t want to download the software, you can still browse the Corinthian Studies Library at Zotero. The search capabilities of the online version are not as great since the engine only mines titles and authors and dates but it’s good for basic searching. You might want to read this page first.

Finally, for you LIST PEOPLE, we’ll be releasing some recent bibliographic material over the course of the next week. Stay tuned.

Corinthian Scholarship Monthly (December-February). Part 2

Here is the second part to last week’s post about new scholarship in the last three months.

You can find the full collection of articles and books related to Corinthian studies at the Corinthian Studies Zotero Page. If you don’t see URLs for articles and books below (they sometimes don’t transfer in the copy), visit the Zotero group page. The new entries are tagged according to master categories .ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY or .NEW TESTAMENT AND EARLY CHRISTIAN.

As I noted previously, Version 2 of the library in RIS format is scheduled to be released by summer. I am always looking for reviewers of articles or books listed in the CSM posts. If you can write and are qualified, drop me a line.

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Adams, Edward. The Earliest Christian Meeting Places: Almost Exclusively Houses? A&C Black, 2014. http://books.google.com/books?id=FNBBAgAAQBAJ.

Angeli Bernardini, Paola, ed. Corinto: luogo di azione e luogo di racconto : atti del convengo internazionale, Urbino, 23-25 settembre 2009. Pisa [etc.]: F. Serra, 2013. http://www.libraweb.net/result1.php?dettagliononpdf=1&chiave=2848&valore=sku&name=Luogo.jpg&h=870&w=600.

Balzat, Jean-Sébastien, and Benjamin W. Millis. “M. Antonius Aristocrates: Provincial Involvement with Roman Power in the Late 1st Century B.C.” Hesperia: The Journal of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens 82, no. 4 (December 2013): 651–72. doi:10.2972/hesperia.82.4.0651.

Batchvarov, Kroum N. “Clay Pipes and Smoking Paraphernalia from the Kitten Shipwreck, an Early Nineteenth-Century Black Sea Merchantman.” International Journal of Historical Archaeology 18, no. 1 (March 1, 2014): 1–19. doi:10.1007/s10761-013-0244-z.

Bradshaw, Paul F. Rites of Ordination: Their History and Theology. Liturgical Press, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=shQpnQEACAAJ.

Çakırlar, C., S. Ikram, and M-H. Gates. “New Evidence for Fish Processing in the Ancient Eastern Mediterranean: Formalised Epinephelus Butchery in Fifth Century Bc Kinet Höyük, Turkey.” International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, January 1, 2014, n/a–n/a. doi:10.1002/oa.2388.

Docter, Roald, and Babette Bechtold. “Two Forgotten Amphorae from the Hamburg Excavations at Carthage (Cyprus, and the Iberian Peninsula) and Their Contexts.” Carthage Studies 5 (2011) (2013): 91–128.

Forbes, Hamish A. “Off-Site Scatters and the Manuring Hypothesis in Greek Survey Archaeology: An Ethnographic Approach.” Hesperia: The Journal of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens 82, no. 4 (December 2013): 551–94. doi:10.2972/hesperia.82.4.0551.

Hall, Jonathan M. Artifact and Artifice: Classical Archaeology and the Ancient Historian. University of Chicago Press, 2014.

Heil, Andreas, and Gregor Damschen, eds. Brill’s Companion to Seneca: Philosopher and Dramatist. Leiden: Brill, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=9jqOAgAAQBAJ.

Jones, Catherine M. “Theatre of Shame: The Impact of Paul’s Manual Labour on His Apostleship in Corinth.” PhD Thesis, University of St. Michael’s College, 2013. https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/handle/1807/43420.

Laios, K., G. Tsoucalas, M. Karamanou, and G. Androutsos. “The Medical–Religious Practice of Votive Offerings and the Representation of a Unique Pathognomonic One Inside the Asclepieion of Corinth.” Journal of Religion and Health, 2013, 1–6. doi:10.1007/s10943-013-9811-1.

Lambert, Craig. “Norman Naval Operations in the Mediterranean.” Journal for Maritime Research 15, no. 2 (2013): 241–43. doi:10.1080/21533369.2013.852314.

Last, Richard. “Money, Meals and Honour: The Economic and Honorific Organization of the Corinthian Ekklesia.” PhD Thesis, University of Toronto, 2013.

Nichols, Aidan. Figuring out the Church: Her Marks, and Her Masters. Ignatius Press, 2013.

Polinskaya, Irene. A Local History of Greek Polytheism: Gods, People and the Land of Aigina, 800-400 BCE. Leiden: Brill, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=8FqNAgAAQBAJ.

Punt, Jeremy. “Framing Human Dignity through Domination and Submission? Negotiating Borders and Loyalties (of Power) in the New Testament.” Scriptura 112 (2013): 1–17. doi:10.7833/112-0-82.

Reed, David Alan. “Paul on Marriage and Singleness:  Reading 1 Corinthians with the Augustan Marriage Laws.” PhD Thesis, University of St. Michael’s College, 2013. https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/bitstream/1807/43426/1/Reed_David_A_201311_PhD_thesis.pdf.

Rowan, Clare. “Coinage as Commodity and Bullion in the Western Mediterranean, Ca. 550–100 BCE.” Mediterranean Historical Review 28, no. 2 (2013): 105–27. doi:10.1080/09518967.2013.837638.

Saliari, Konstantina, and Erich Draganits. “Early Bronze Age Bone Tubes from the Aegean: Archaeological Context, Use and Distribution.” Archeometriai Műhely [Archaeometry Workshop], 2013, 179–92.

Schoenborn, Christoph Cardinal. The Source of Life: Exploring the Mystery of the Eucharist. Ignatius Press, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=oydLAgAAQBAJ.

Spinks, Bryan D. Do This in Remembrance of Me: The Eucharist from the Early Church to the Present Day. SCM Press, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=-309AgAAQBAJ.

Stoneman, Richard. Pindar. I.B.Tauris, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=jwlgAgAAQBAJ.

Thiessen, Matthew. “‘The Rock Was Christ’: The Fluidity of Christ’s Body in 1 Corinthians 10.4.” Journal for the Study of the New Testament 36, no. 2 (December 1, 2013): 103–26. doi:10.1177/0142064X13506171.

Toffolo, Michael B., Alexander Fantalkin, Irene S. Lemos, Rainer C. S. Felsch, Wolf-Dietrich Niemeier, Guy D. R. Sanders, Israel Finkelstein, and Elisabetta Boaretto. “Towards an Absolute Chronology for the Aegean Iron Age: New Radiocarbon Dates from Lefkandi, Kalapodi and Corinth.” PLoS ONE 8, no. 12 (December 26, 2013): e83117. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0083117.

Wallace, Christopher. “Ager Publicus in the Greek East: I. Priene 111 and Other Examples of Resistance to the Publicani.” Historia 63, no. 1 (2014): 38–73.

———. “Ager Publicus in the Greek East: I. Priene 111 and Other Examples of Resistance to the Publicani.” Historia 63, no. 1 (2014): 38–73.

Walsh, Justin St P. Consumerism in the Ancient World: Imports and Identity Construction. Routledge, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=XU83AgAAQBAJ.

A New Bibliography for 1 and 2 Corinthians

It’s easy these days to locate books and articles related to St. Paul’s letters to the Corinthians. Bibliographies have proliferated online and lists of select commentaries and introductions are a dime a dozen. See, for a few examples, the bibliographic lists compiled on Bible.org, BiblicalStudies.org (with some PDF documents), Baker publishing group, the United Methodist Church (see Part IV), and Leaven (2 Corinthians).

Here at Corinthian Matters, we’ve been slowly building our New Testament collection in the Zotero Library. During the fall, Megan Piette, a history major at my school, invested hours and hours into adding hundreds of relevant New Testament entries. She keyed all articles published in three recent works related to archaeology, history, and the New Testament: Urban Religion in Roman Corinth (2005), Corinth in Context (2010), and Corinth in Contrast (2013). More impressively, she entered all relevant Corinthiaka listed in the bibliography sections of Urban Religion in Roman Corinth and Corinth in Context. Finally, she mined the references sections of a couple of commentaries and New Testament introductions. The collection is by no means exhaustive but it is a good one that includes 526 items representing major commentaries, books, and articles. Kudos to Megan for making this happen.

Thanks to batch tagging in Zotero (see my post from Thursday), I was able to categorize all of these under the master tag .NEW TESTAMENT and create a subcollection called “New Testament”. In addition, I tagged items with keywords such as “commentary”, “1 Corinthians” and “2 Corinthians”. So, if you want to find recent commentaries on 1 and 2 Corinthians, just select the two tags “.NEW TESTAMENT” and “commentary”. The search pulls up 33 items.

Zotero_Corinthians_1

I also tagged articles and books that deal with specific chapters in 1 and 2 Corinthians. So if you’re interested in relevant material on 1 Corinthians Chapter 13 (the famous love chapter), simply select the tag “_1 Cor. 13”. This is a critical component of the library because the search feature of Zotero does not work as well — since articles and abstracts use different ways of referencing the texts, e.g., “I Corinthans XIII”, “1 Cor. 13”, “First Corinthians Chapter Thirteen” etc…

Note that this tag does not pull in entire commentaries on 1 Corinthians, which obviously have something to say on that chapter.

Zotero_Corinthians_2

There are lots of holes in this bibliography, and we need another round of thorough tagging, but this is a start to providing a useful bibliographic collection related to the Corinthian correspondence and St. Paul’s Corinth. We’ll keep building the Zotero Library until some better online tool takes its place.

I invite readers with a background in New Testament studies to comment below on other accessible online bibliographic resources that can guide an interested person in locating relevant books and articles. If you have articles and books that you believe should be included, you may send them to me here.

The Corinthia Zotero Library: New Organization

Yesterday I discovered batch tagging in Zotero. Instead of manually changing tags one at a time (an incredibly time-consuming process), one can batch tag by dragging a selection of multiple items onto any tag in the tag selector box in the Standalone version of Zotero.

This feature effectively allowed me to tackle the tags in the library. I recategorize all 1,927 items in the Corinthia (Zotero) Bibliography Library in a couple of hours. Manually tagging those items would take days.

The tag categories I’ve created are neither perfect nor complete, but there is now a little more order to the collection than it previously had. Every item has been assigned to one of two major tag categories: .ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY or .NEW TESTAMENT. These show up as the first two tags in the Tags area to the lower left of the Zotero Library (see below). The following image shows the items that appear when one selects on the master tag category .ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY

Zotero_1

An item may belong to both categories in the case of – for example — archaeological and historical scholarship that is directed to or clearly relevant to New Testament studies, or New Testament scholarship that informs the history and archaeology of Corinth. In the following example, I’ve selected both master tag categories and another subcategory “Periods, Hellenistic.”

Zotero_2

I’ve also slid created subfolders for browsing called “New Testament” and “Archaeology and History” for two principal audiences of Corinthian studies. Whether one browses by main tag category or by folder, the results should be the same. Note that all 1,927 individual bibliographic items can be found in the master Library folder. An item in the sub-folder collections also exists in the master folder.

Zotero_3

NB: At the time of this update, the items are still in need of a more thorough tagging, and this will require some manual input. Where I have added tags are for main places in the Corinthia: “Corinth”, “Corinthia” (for territory), “Kenchreai”, “Lechaion”, “Isthmus of Corinth” and “Isthmia”. I’ve also added periods for many (but not all) items, e.g., “Period, Roman.” These period tags parallel the chronological designations used on this website.

For now, the visitor using the server version of the library (and not the stand-alone) should experiment with a combination of direct searches in the search box, tagging, and browsing by subfolder.

One area other that I spent cleaning up this morning was the section on New Testament studies. I’ll write more about this tomorrow.

Coming Soon: The Roman Conquest of Greece

A new book on the Roman conquest of Greece – which ends in the destruction of Corinth. Coming April 2014.

Waterfield, Robin. Taken at the Flood: The Roman Conquest of Greece. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

Here’s the book description from Amazon:

Taken at the Flood

“Is there anyone on earth who is so narrow-minded or uninquisitive that he could fail to want to know how and thanks to what kind of political system almost the entire known world was conquered and brought under a single empire in less than fifty-three years?” –Polybius, Histories

The 53-year period Polybius had in mind stretched from the start of the Second Punic War in 219 BCE until 167, when Rome overthrew the Macedonian monarchy and divided the country into four independent republics. This was the crucial half-century of Rome’s spectacular rise to imperial status, but Roman interest in its eastern neighbors began a little earlier, with the First Illyrian War of 229, and climaxed later with the infamous destruction of Corinth in 146.

Taken at the Flood chronicles this momentous move by Rome into the Greek east. Until now, this period of history has been overshadowed by the threat of Carthage in the west, but events in the east were no less important in themselves, and Robin Waterfield’s account reveals the peculiar nature of Rome’s eastern policy. For over seventy years, the Romans avoided annexation so that they could commit their military and financial resources to the fight against Carthage and elsewhere. Though ultimately a failure, this policy of indirect rule, punctuated by periodic brutal military interventions and intense diplomacy, worked well for several decades, until the Senate finally settled on more direct forms of control.

Waterfield’s fast-paced narrative focuses mainly on military and diplomatic maneuvers, but throughout he interweaves other topics and themes, such as the influence of Greek culture on Rome, the Roman aristocratic ethos, and the clash between the two best fighting machines the ancient world ever produced: the Macedonian phalanx and Roman legion. The result is an absorbing account of a critical chapter in Rome’s mastery of the Mediterranean.”

And the Table of Contents from Oxford University Press:

Preface
List of Illustrations
Prelude: Clouds in the West
1: The Coming of Rome
2: The Illyrian Wars
3: The First Macedonian War
4: The Second Macedonian War
5: War against Antiochus and the Aetolians
6: Remote Control
7: The Third Macedonian War
8: From Pydna to Corinth
9: A Glimpse into the Future
Key Dates
Cast of Characters
Glossary, Money, Names
Notes
Bibliography
Index