Corinthian Scholarship (March 2011)

I stumbled upon a good number of Corinthian papers, presentations, and publications this month that cover topics from Isthmia, Kenchreai, Aphrodite and prostitute, and Paul’s ascent in 2 Cor. 12.

First, Corinthian archaeology and history:

Anne Pippin Burnett has a piece in GRBS 51 (2011) on Pindar and prostitution at Corinth: “Servants of Peitho: Pindar fr.122 S

Mosaics from Kenchreai are featured in the new bookShip Iconography in Mosaics: An aid to understanding ancient ships and their construction (2011).

Local presentations by Corinthian archaeologists include Jayni Reinhard, who lectured last week at Arizona State University on “Benefactions, Baths, and Boys: The Roman Bath at Isthmia,”  and Joseph Rife, who will be speaking soon at Purdue on his recent work at Roman Kenchreai

This is old news but I noted in the 2010 report of the Chicago Excavations at Isthmia that the volume on the isthmus conference held at the American School at Athens in 2007 was submitted last summer to the American School of Classical Studies at Athens for review.  Description of the volume from the Chicago website:

“A volume of seventeen essays entitled “’The Bridge of the untiring sea’: The Isthmus of Corinth from the Bronze Age to Late Antiquity” edited by E. R. Gebhard and T. E. Gregory has been submitted to the American School of Classical Studies in Athens for publication as a volume in theIsthmia series or as a Hesperia supplement. Included in the collection is the editio princeps of an Isthmian victor list found in Corinth and the publication of five marble statues from the Roman shrine of Palaimon. While addressing a variety of topics, all papers explore the links between the city of Corinth, the Sanctuary of Isthmian Poseidon, and the area of the Isthmus.”

The Chicago Excavations site also notes on the same page that the conference on the archaeology of the Corinthia held two years ago in Loutraki is being published by the German Archaeological Institute in Athens. I heard in the fall this was on its way, but I don’t see news of it on the website of the DAI.  Anyone know?

New Testament studies for the month include:

  • M. David Litwa’s “Paul’s Mosaic Ascent: An Interpretation of 2 Corinthians 12.7-9,” in Journal of New Testament Studies 57.2 (2011).  Abstract: “This essay offers a reading of 2 Cor 12.7–9 in light of a rabbinic story of Moses’ ascent to heaven (b. Šabb. 88b-89a). After an exploration of Moses in 2 Corinthians the author argues that vv. 7–9, like vv. 2–4, constitute an ascent report (vv. 2–4). This ascent report, it is maintained, is structurally parallel to Moses’ heavenly ascent in b. Šabb. 88b-89a. Early traditions of Moses’ ascent to heaven and dominance over angels suggest that Paul knew a form of the Mosaic ascent, and parodied it to highlight his weakness and paradoxical authority in vv. 7–9.”
  • Dustin Ellington, “Imitating Paul’s Relationship to the Gospel: 1 Corinthians 8.1-11.1,” in Journal for the Study of the New Testament 33.3 (2011).  Abstract: “To overcome past shortcomings in the interpretation of Paul’s exhortation ‘Imitate me, as I imitate Christ’ (1 Cor. 11.1), we must study the roles of Paul’s ‘I’ and Christ in the context of 1 Cor. 8.1—11.1. Christ died for the weak (8.11), and Paul’s renunciation of his apostolic rights follows this pattern. Paul’s self-portrayal reaches its climax when he says that he does all things for the sake of the gospel, in order to be συγκòıνωνòςς αυτòυ (9.23). This article proposes that the expression συγκòıνωνòςς αυτòυ contains more shades of meaning than scholars have previously allowed. It summarizes Paul’s aim to be the gospel’s partner in the salvation of others and to participate in the gospel’s pattern and power. Paul’s call to imitation exhorts the Corinthian believers to share in his relationship to the gospel, working with it for the salvation of others and allowing its pattern and power to shape their life together.”
  • Wayne Coppins, “To Eat or not to Eat Meat?  Conversion, Bodily Practice, and the Relationship between Formal Worship and Everyday Life in the Anthropology of Religion in 1 Corinthians 8:7,” in Biblical Theology Bulletin 41.2 (2011).  Abstract: “This article aims to contribute to the topic of conversion in the New Testament by drawing upon insights from the anthropology of religion. Taking up Rebecca Sachs Norris’s focus on embodied culture, and Simon Coleman’s and Peter Collins’s extension of Bourdieu’s concept of habitus, I attempt to bring Paul’s argument in 1 Corinthians 8:7 into sharper focus by reflecting theoretically on the ingrained associations of bodily practice, and the relationship between ritual worship and everyday life. In doing so, I also aim to add complexity to our overall picture of “the Pauline model of conversion.”
  • Corinth gets extensive treatment in Callewaert The World of Saint Paul (Ignatius: 2011) and Stephen Westerholm (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Paul (Wiley-Blackwell: 2011)


Three new papers on the Roman Corinthia and Isthmus

A new book on Hellenistic to Roman Corinth called Corinth in Contrast: Studies in Inequality is now in the works.  The volume is edited by Friesen, James, and Schowalter and is based on the conference in Austin in early October which brought together archaeologists, historians, and New Testament scholars to discuss the topic of inequality and contrast in the ancient city.  Two earlier posts about the conference can be found  here and here.

If you’re interested in the Roman Corinthia or Isthmus, three working papers have been posted online.  These are drafts that will undoubtedly change as the papers are reviewed and edited, but they provide a sense of how the Isthmus fits well within a discussion of inequality and contrast.  Agriculture and land use, commerce and transit, and imperial monuments.  That about sums up the common conceptions of the isthmus in antiquity.

Guy Sander’s piece, “Landlords and Tenants: Sharecroppers and Subsistence Farming in Corinthian Historical Context,”  examines documentary evidence for peasant farming, land use, sharecropping, and land and taxes in the Peloponnese in recent centuries (16th-19th) and makes comparisons to the growing Roman colony of the first century.

Bill Caraher’s chapter, “The Ambivalent Landscape of Christian Corinth: The Archaeology of Place, Theology, and Politics in a Late Antique City,” examines the theme of resistance to imperial action evident in the landscape of the Corinthia in the 6th century AD, and discusses the early Christian basilicas of territory, settlement patterns (from the Eastern Korinthia Archaeological Survey), the Hexamilion fortification wall, and Corinthian theology.

My piece, “The Diolkos and the Emporium: How a Land Bridge Framed the Commercial Economy of Roman Corinth,” examines ancient conceptions for how the Isthmus shaped the economy of the city.  I argue that the diolkos played almost no role in ancient conception while the emporium in the harbors of Kenchreai and Lechaion were central to the ancient image of the economy of the city.  The piece can be downloaded here, and I’ve embedded it in the document below.

1 Corinthians – 2010 Publications

Keeping up with the scholarship on 1 Corinthians and 2 Corinthians must require a lot of work.  The following list is not comprehensive but it does give a sense of some of the currents in scholarship on 1 Corinthians in the last year.  I include academic publications (books, articles, dissertations, and master’s theses) that relate to 1 Corinthians.  I will post separately on 2010 publications in 2 Corinthians and the Pauline context.  If you produced an academic publication  in 2010 that can be added to the following list, feel free to send it my way.  The updated list will live permanently here.

Thanks to Messiah College history student Tara Anderson for help in putting this list together.

1 Corinthians: Commentaries and Studies

Carter, C.L., The Great Sermon Tradition as a Fiscal Framework in 1 Corinthians: Towards a Pauline Theology of Material Possessions (T & T Clark)

Ciampa, R.E. and B.S. Rosner, The First Letter to the Corinthians (Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.)

Lockwood, G.J., 1 Corinthians (Concordia Popular Commentary)

Zeller, D. Der erste Brief an die Korinther, (Vandenhoeck + Ruprecht Gm)

1 Corinthians: Studies of Particular Passages / Subjects

Collier, C.P. “Proclaiming the Lord’s Death: An Exegesis of 1 Cor 11:17-34 in Light of the Greco-Roman Banquet” (Master’s Thesis: Liberty University)

Finney, M.T., “Honor, Rhetoric and Factionalism in the Ancient World: 1 Corinthians 1-4 in Its Social ContextBiblical Theology Bulletin: A Journal of Bible and Theology Vol.40, No. 1

Finney, M., “Honour, Head-coverings and Headship: 1 Corinthians 11.2-16 in its Social Context” in Journal for the Study of the New Testament Vol. 33, No. 1

Gupta, N.K., “Which ‘Body’ Is a Temple (1 Corinthians 6:19)? Paul beyond the Individual/ Communal Divide”.  In Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 72, No. 3

Hansen, B., All of You Are One: The Social Vision of Galatians 3.28, 1 Corinthians 12.13 and Colossians. 3.11 (T & T Clark 2010)

Hiu, E., Regulations Concerning Tongues and Prophecy in 1 Corinthians 14.26-40:  Relevance Beyond the Corinthian Church (Book: T & T Clark)

Hodge, C.J., “Married to an Unbeliever: Households, Hierarchies, and Holiness in 1 Corinthians 7: 12–16” in  Harvard Theological Review, Vol. 103, No. 1

Hollander, H.W., “Seeing God ‘in a riddle’ or ‘face to face’: An Analysis of 1 Corinthians 13.12,” Journal for the Study of the New Testament 32.4

Hwang, Jin Ki, Mimesis and Apostolic Parousia in 1 Corinthians 4 and 5: An Apologetic-Mimetic Interpretation (Book)

Inkelaar, Harm-Jan, “Conflict on wisdom: The Role of Scripture in 1 Corinthians 1-4” (Doctoral Thesis: Universiteit van Tilburg)

Kim, O., “Paul and politics: Ekklesia, household, and empire in 1 Corinthians 1-7”(Doctoral Thesis: Drew University).

Kwon, O.Y., “A Critical Review of Recent Scholarship on the Pauline Opposition and the Nature of its Wisdom (σοϕί α) in 1 Corinthians 1—4” in Currents in Biblical Research Vol. 8, No. 3

Kwon, O.Y., “Discovering the Characteristics of Collegia—Collegia  Sodalicia and Collegia Tenuiorum in 1 Corinthians 8, 10 and 15” in Horizons in Biblical Theology Vol. 32, No.2

Lakey, M.J., Image and glory of God: 1 Corinthians 11:2-16 as a Case Study in Bible, Gender and Hermeneutics (T & T Clark 2010)

Parrish, J.W., “Speaking in Tongues, Dancing with Ghosts: Redescription, Translation, and the Language of Resurrection” in Studies in Religion/Sciences Religieuses Vol. 39 No. 1

Seebarran, R.R., “1 Corinthians 15:12: The Corinthian Controversy Over the Resurrection of the Dead.” ( Master’s Thesis: Wycliffe College)

Corinthian History and Archaeology: 2010 Publications

2010 was a big year for publications on Corinthian history and archaeology.  I created the list below using various search engines (google scholar, worldcat, etc..) none of which are fully comprehensive.  I included academic publications (books, articles, dissertations, and master’s theses) that relate to the archaeology and history of the Corinthia from prehistory to the present.  I will post separately on 2010 publications in New Testament studies, which is simply an enormous field.

If you published something in 2010 that can be added to the following list, please send my way along with links if available.  The updated list will live permanently here.

Thanks to Tara Anderson for help in putting this list together.

General

Morgan, Catherine, “Corinthia,” in Archaeological Reports 56 (2010), pp 21 -26.

Prehistoric

Petroutsa, Eirini I. and Sotiris K. Manolis “Reconstructing Late Bronze Age diet in mainland Greece using stable isotope analysis,” in Journal of Archaeological Science, 2010

Early Iron Age

Flognfeldt, Yngve Thomassen, “Sanctuaries and votive offerings from The Early Iron Age in Greece-A comparative study of votive offerings from the eastern Peloponnese

Archaic-Hellenistic

Bonnier, A., “Harbours and Hinterlands: Landscape, Site Patterns and Coast-Hinterland Interconnections by the Corinthian Gulf, c. 600-300 BC” [Doctoral Thesis] 2010

Bookidis, N., The Sanctuary of Demeter and Kore: The Terracotta Sculpture (Corinth XVIII.5) [Book] Athens: American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

Bukina, A.G., “ILIOUPERSIS ON A CORINTHIAN BLACK-FIGURED PYXIS IN THE STATE HERMITAGE MUSEUM”in Antike Kunst, 2010

Bukina, A.G., “NEOPTOLEMUS IN TROY. A CORINTHIAN RED FIGURE PYXIS FROM THE STATE HERMITAGE” in Vestnik drevnej istorii, 2010

Caraher, W.R., D.K. Pettegrew, and S. James, “Towers and Fortifications at Vayia in the Southeast Corinthia,” Hesperia 79.3 2010

Donati, J.C. “Marks of State Ownership and the Greek Agora at Corinth”in American Journal of Archaeology, 2010.

Gabrielli, R., Ceramica etrusco-corinzia del Museo archeologico di Tarquinia. Book 1 vol. (XIII-567 p. -26 p. de fig. -XXX p. de pl.)

Išin, Gül, “PATARA TEPECİK AKROPOLÜ “BEY EVİ” KAZILARI (2003-2007): GEÇ ARKAİK-ERKEN KLASİK DÖNEM TERRACOTTALARI. (Turkish)” (Excavations of “The Ruler’s House” on the Tepecik Acropolis at Patara (2003-2007): The Terracottas of the Late Archaic-Early Classical Period. (English)), in Olba Journal, May2010, Vol. 18, p85-106

Ivanov, R.V., “Pindar’s Isthmians 3 and 4: essays and commentary” [Doctoral Thesis]

McPhee, I. “Red-Figure Pottery of Uncertain Origin from Corinth: Stylistic and Chemical Analyses” in Hesperia, 2010

Papadogiannis; A.S., M.C. Tsakoumaki, T.G. Chondros, ““Deus-Ex-Machina” Mechanism Reconstruction in the Theater of Phlius, Corinthia,” in Journal of Mechanical Design, Jan2010, 132 Issue 1.

Schaffrin, B., and K. Snow, “Total Least-Squares regularization of Tykhonov type and an ancient racetrack in Corinth,” in Linear Algebra and its Applications, 2010

Stickler, T., Korinth und seine Kolonien: Die Stadt am Isthmus im Mächtegefüge des klassischen Griechenland [Book]

Twele, R.M., “The so-called Union of Corinth and Argos and the nature of the polis”[Master’s Thesis] Chapel Hill, N.C. : University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Roman

Friesen, S.J., D.N Schowalter, and J.C. Walters, Corinth in context : comparative studies on religion and society, [Book]

Gleason, M., “Making Space for Bicultural Identity: Herodes Atticus Commemorates Regilla” in T. Whitmarsh (ed.), Local Knowledge and Microidentities in the Imperial Greek World

Iversen, P.A. “A Prytany Dedication from Athens Found at Corinth”, in Hesperia, 2010

Strocka, V.M., Die Gefangenenfassade an der Agora von Korinth: ihr Ort in der römischen Kunstgeschichte. [Book]

Late Antique & Early Christian

Brown, A.R., “Islands in a Sea of Change? Continuity and Abandonment in Dark Age Corinth and Thessaloniki” International Journal of Historical Archaeology

Brown, A.R., “JUSTINIAN, PROCOPIUS, AND DECEPTION: LITERARY LIES, IMPERIAL POLITICS, AND THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF SIXTH-CENTURY GREECE”, inA.J. TurnerK. O. Chong-GossardJ.H. Kimand F.J. Vervaet (eds.), Private and Public Lies: The Discourse of Despotism

Caraher, W.R., “Abandonment, Authority, and Religious Continuity in Post-Classical Greece” In International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 2010

Garvie-Lok, S., “A Possible Witness to the Sixth Century Slavic Invasion of Greece from the Stadium Tunnel at Ancient Nemea”in International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 2010

Pettegrew, D.K., “Regional Survey and the Boom-and-bust Countryside: Re-reading the Archaeological Evidence for Episodic Abandonment in the Late Roman Corinthia”, inInternational Journal of Historical Archaeology, 2010

Sweetman, R., “The Christianization of the Peloponnese: The Topography and Function of Late Antique Churches,” in Journal of Late Antiquity, 2010

Byzantine to Modern

Athanassopoulos, E. “Landscape Archaeology and the Medieval Countryside: Settlement and Abandonment in the Nemea Region” in International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 2010

Sutton, S.B., “Disconnected Landscapes: Ancient Sites, Travel Guides, and Local Identity in Modem Greece”, in Anthropology of East Europe Review, 2010

Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, L., “Remembering and Forgetting: The Relationship Between Memory and the Abandonment of Graves in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Greek Cemeteries.” In International Journal of Historical Archaeology 14.2 (2010), 285-301.

Inequalities in Corinth

I just returned from Austin where I participated in the “Corinth in Contrast” conference.  As I detailed in earlier posts, the conference was dedicated to exploring the theme of inequality in the Corinthia in the Hellenistic and Roman eras.  It was, in this sense, a bit more focused than the two earlier conferences organized by Friesen, Schowalter, and Walters: “Urban Religion in Roman Corinth” and “Corinth in Context.”  Both of those earlier conferences resulted in two books Urban Religion in Roman Corinth: Interdisciplinary Approaches (2004) and Corinth in Context: Comparative Studies on Religion and Society(2010), each containing articles that were broad and synthetic in content, especially those chapters exploring archaeological evidence.  For example, while Corinth in Context contains some focused problem-specific studies on Erastus (Friesen) and dining and domestic space in 1 Corinthians (Walters, Schowalter), among others, there are numerous synthetic chapters on topics like “Asklepios in Greek and Roman Corinth” (B. Wickkiser), “The Coinage of Roman Corinth” (Walbank), “Religion and Society at Roman Kenchreai” (Rife), “The Christian Community in Corinth in the Late Roman and Early Byzantine Eras” (Walbank), and “Religion and society in the Roman Eastern Corinthia” (Gregory).  Both of those volumes, then, will form very useful starting places for anyone interested in New Testament Corinth and recent assessments of religion and society in the Hellenistic and Roman eras.

Like the last two conferences, Corinth in Contrast brought together scholars of varied backgrounds familiar with different kinds of evidence and models: the New Testament, religious studies, early Christianity, Classics, field archaeology, art history, and ancient history.  One major difference this time around: a Corinthian archaeologist, Dr. Sarah James, played a role as co-organizer.  The papers focused around the theme of wealth and inequality and each paper more or less addressed the themes as part of broader discussions of problems related to the ancient economy, agriculture and trade, the nature of leadership and patronage, gender inequities, elite expressions, banqueting, magic, and monumental architecture, among others.

The presenters and paper respondents gave us a sense of the nature of inequality in a region like ancient Corinth and how differently it looked from the inequities of our own modern world.  As L. Michael White noted, inequality in antiquity was not simply a matter of net worth, but centered around issues of personal connectedness and relationships, land ownership, and one’s relative isolation from supporting social networks.  The different presentations showed how inequality in Hellenistic and Roman Corinth originated in different ways (agriculture, trade, social connection) and was articulated in the local urban and rural landscape: in the program that an elite villa owner adopted to paint the wall of a house; in the boundaries that the newly-wealthy freedmen class reinscribed around their new political powers; in the inequities of gender and status that were constant in public discourses, private households, and banqueting; and in the local “resistances” by day laborers to imperial theological messages.

And yet, the framework of inequality is, as Steve Friesen noted in his opening remarks, so compelling because of its importance for understanding the layers of our own society.  Is it not fundamental to understand the nature of wealth and poverty, and social and economic inequities in ancient society?  As an intellectual framework, it provides a means to understand the ancient world, ancient Corinth, the Pauline community, more concretely.  And as a modern framework, it provides for educators a means of helping students (and ourselves) think about the social conditions of our world and the “abnormal” nature of inequality.

I hope to write more about some of the individual papers in the rest of this week.  All of them were interesting, some controversial, some “blockbusters.”  Check out the blog of Bill Caraher of the University of North Dakota, who was also in attendance at the conference and has already shared his thoughts.

Corinth in Contrast Conference

We’ve got another Corinth conference in the works at the University of Texas.   In late September, the Departments of Religious Studies and Classics, and the Institute for the Study of Antiquity and Christian Origins will be hosting a conference on the theme of “Corinth in Contrast: Studies in Inequality.  As the conference website states:

“This conference explores the stratified nature of social, political, economic, and religious spheres at Corinth, and how the resulting inequalities are reflected in literary texts and material remains.  The analysis focuses on a specific population center (the Corinthia) over a given period of time (Hellenistic to Late Antique).”

The 12 presentations include topics covering the city and territory from the 3rd century BC to 7th century AD, and include discussions on individuals like Phoebe of Kenchreai, Junia Theodora, Herodes Atticus, and the Emperor Justinian.  Judging from the titles, St. Paul should make an appearance in at least a few papers.  Thematically, the papers include such topics as agricultural systems, magic and ritual, dining, slavery, and mixed marriages in 1 Corinthians, and elite expenditure and expression.

This is the third conference held at the University of Texas dedicated to  interdisciplinary discussion of the themes of religion and society in the Hellenistic and Roman periods.  The last two were published as Urban Religion in Roman Corinth: Interdisciplinary Appraoches (2004) and Corinth in Context: Comparative Studies on Religion and Society (2010).  And the  conference organizers, Steve Friesen and Sarah James, have plans to publish this third conference quickly.

Over the next few weeks, I will be blogging about the conference presentations including my own paper on the diolkos and the commercial facility of Corinth.  I expect that my colleague Bill Caraher of the University of North Dakota will be as well.  He has already give us some preliminary thoughts about late antique prosperity and monumental architecture in the 5th and 6th century Corinthia.