Corinthian Scholarship Monthly (October 2013)

Here’s the round-up of new Corinthiaka scholarship for the month of October. Happy Reading. You can also find these entries at the Corinthian Studies Group Library Page in Zotero.

Bronze Age

Early Iron Age-Hellenistic

Roman and Late Antique

New Testament and Early Christian

  • Brown, Alexandra R. “Creation, Gender, and Identity in (New) Cosmic Perspective: 1 Corinthians 11:2-16.” In The Unrelenting God: Essays on God’s Action in Scripture in Honor of Beverly Roberts Gaventa, edited by David J. Downs and Matthew L. Skinner, 172–193. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=uuBgAQAAQBAJ.
  • Downing, F. Gerald. Order and (Dis)order in the First Christian Century: A General Survey of Attitudes. BRILL, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=PfeZAAAAQBAJ
  • Eastman, Susan Grove. “Ashes on the Frontal Lobe: Cognitive Dissonance and Cruciform Cognition in 2 Corinthians.” In The Unrelenting God: Essays on God’s Action in Scripture in Honor of Beverly Roberts Gaventa, edited by David J. Downs and Matthew L. Skinner, 194–207. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=uuBgAQAAQBAJ
  • Schellenberg, Ryan S. Rethinking Paul’s Rhetorical Education: Comparative Rhetoric and 2 Corinthians 10–13. Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=8TRXAQAAQBAJ
  • Van den Hoek, Annewies. “The Saga of Peter and Paul: Emblems of Catholic Identity in Christian Literature and Art.” In Pottery, Pavements, and Paradise: Iconographic and Textual Studies on Late Antiquity, edited by Annewies van den Hoek and John Joseph Herrmann, 301–326. BRILL, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=RcJSAQAAQBAJ

Diachronic

  • Hadler, H., A. Vött, B. Koster, M. Mathes-Schmidt, T. Mattern, K. Ntageretzis, K. Reicherter, and T. Willershäuser. “Multiple late-Holocene Tsunami Landfall in the Eastern Gulf of Corinth Recorded in the Palaeotsunami Geo-archive at Lechaion, Harbour of Ancient Corinth” (2013).
  • Williams, Charles K., II. “Corinth, 2011: Investigation of the West Hall of the Theater.” Hesperia: The Journal of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens 82, no. 3 (2013): 487–549. doi:10.2972/hesperia.82.3.0487.

Corinth in Contrast

I was pleased to see via FB that Corinth in Contrast: Studies in Inequality went live this morning at Brill’s website—a month in advance of the annual meeting of the SBL in Baltimore and well in advance of the AIA meeting in Chicago. (So look for the book if you will attend one of these conferences.)

The work is edited by Steve Friesen, Sarah James, and Dan Schowalter, and includes contributions by a gang of scholars working on Corinthian archaeology, history, and/or New Testament studies. It marks the fruition of a conference held three years ago in Austin, Texas. Bill Caraher covered the conference at The Archaeology of the Mediterranean World blog, as we did here at Corinthian Matters:

As the abstract to the book notes: “In Corinth in Contrast, archaeologists, historians, art historians, classicists, and New Testament scholars examine the stratified nature of socio-economic, political, and religious interactions in the city from the Hellenistic period to Late Antiquity. The volume challenges standard social histories of Corinth by focusing on the unequal distribution of material, cultural, and spiritual resources. Specialists investigate specific aspects of cultural and material stratification such as commerce, slavery, religion, marriage and family, gender, and art, analyzing both the ruling elite of Corinth and the non-elite Corinthians who made up the majority of the population. This approach provides insight into the complex networks that characterized every ancient urban center and sets an agenda for future studies of Corinth and other cities rule by Rome.”

The Table of Contents looks like this:

1. Inequality in Corinth (Steven J. Friesen, Sarah A. James, and Daniel N. Schowalter)

PART ONE: ELITES AND NON-ELITES

2. The Last of the Corinthians? Society and Settlement from 146 to 44 (Sarah A. James)

3. The Local Magistrates and Elite of Roman Corinth (Benjamin W. Millis

4. “You Were Bought with a Price”: Freedpersons and Things in 1 Corinthians (Laura Salah Nasrallah)

5. Painting Practices in Roman Corinth: Greek or Roman? (Sarah Lepinksi)

PART TWO: SOCIO-ECONOMIC INEQUALITIES IN CORINTH

6. Landlords and Tenants: Sharecroppers and Subsistence Farming in Corinthian Historical Context (Guy D.R. Sanders)

7. The Diolkos and the Emporion: How a Land Bridge Framed the Commercial Economy of Roman Corinth (David K. Pettegrew)

8. The Ambivalent Landscape of Christian Corinth: The Archaeology of Place, Theology, and Politics in a Late Antique City (William Caraher)

9. Regilla Standing By: Reconstructed Statuary and Re-inscribed Bases in Fourth-Century Corinth (Daniel N. Schowalter)

PART THREE: INEQUALITIES IN GENDER AND RELIGION IN ROMAN CORINTH

10. Religion and Magic in Roman Corinth (Ronald S. Stroud)

11. Junia Theodora of Corinth: Gendered Inequalities in the Early Empire (Steven J. Friesen)

12. ‘Mixed Marriage’ in Early Christianity: Trajectories from Corinth (Caroline Johnson Hodge)

 

This book adds to a growing number of studies that seek to bring together archaeologists, historians, classicists, and New Testament scholars to shed light on Roman Corinth.

Corinthian Scholarship Monthly (September 2013)

Here is the latest gaggle of articles, books, and theses that filtered into my feed last month – all of which have something to do with the Corinthia directly or indirectly (parallels and comparanda).

Bronze Age

Archaic-Hellenistic

Roman

  • Waldner, Katharina. “Dimensions of Individuality in Ancient Mystery Cults: Religious Practice and Philosophical Discourse.” In The Individual in the Religions of the Ancient Mediterranean, edited by Jörg Rüpke, 215–242. Oxford University Press, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=XeKdAAAAQBAJ.

Late Antique

New Testament

Comparanda

  • Aylward, William, ed. Excavations at Zeugma, Conducted by Oxford University. Los Altos, California: The Packard Humanities Institute, 2013. http://zeugma.packhum.org/toc

Corinthian Scholarship Monthly (December 2012)

Now that the dust has settled on 2012, I release this final CSM issue for the last month of the year. By the end of the January, I’ll post some year-in-review lists for different categories of scholarship. As always, the best place to start for recent Corinthian scholarship at this site is the modern library page, with instructions and links to the Zotero group library.

Archaic-Roman

Brandt, J. Rasmus, and Jon W. Iddeng, eds. Greek and Roman Festivals: Content, Meaning, and Practice. Oxford University Press, 2012. http://books.google.com/books?id=1z6HgqVSQ-wC

Davies, Sarah Helen. “Rome, international power relations, and 146 BCE.” PhD Thesis, University of Texas, 2012. http://repositories.tdl.org/tdl-ir/handle/2152/ETD-UT-2012-08-6262.

Harris, W. V. “Review. Sviatoslav Dmitriev. The Greek Slogan of Freedom and Early Roman Politics in Greece.” The American Historical Review 117, no. 4 (2012): 1276–1277. http://ahr.oxfordjournals.org/content/117/4/1276 

Stissi, Vladimir. “Giving the kerameikos a context: ancient Greek potters’ quarters as part of the polis space, economy and society.” In « Quartiers » artisanaux en Grèce ancienne, edited by Arianna Esposito and Giorgos Sanidas, 201–232. Presses Univ. Septentrion, 2012. http://books.google.com/books?id=LZ_twJ6nAxgC

New Testament

Goodrich, John K. “Review. Emerging Leadership in the Pauline Mission: A Social Identity Perspective on Local Leadership Development in Corinth and Ephesus. By Jack Barentsen. Princeton Theological Monograph Series 168. Eugene, OR: Pickwick, 2011.” Religious Studies Review 38, no. 4 (2012): 241–241. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1748-0922.2012.01650_20.x/abstract 

Schellenberg, Ryan Scott. “‘Where Is The Voice Coming From?’ Querying the Evidence for Paul’s Rhetorical Education in 2 Corinthians 10–13.” PhD Thesis, University of St. Michael’s College, 2012. https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/bitstream/1807/34896/3/Schellenberg_Ryan_S_201211_PhD_thesis.pdf

Medieval and Post-Medieval

Harris, Jonathan, Catherine Holmes, and Eugenia Russell, eds. Byzantines, Latins, and Turks in the Eastern Mediterranean World After 1150. Oxford University Press, 2012. http://books.google.com/books?id=bO_zmrgmn3sC

Archaeological Research at Corinth – Summer 2012

The ASCSA website carries a recent report by Ioulia Tzonou-Herbst summarizing archaeological work in Corinth and the region last summer. The essay offers a snapshot of a wide range of research and programs currently being carried out by archaeologists, art historians, and historians:  the Sanctuary of Demeter and Kore, the Gymnasium, Fountain of the Lamps, Theater, Captives Façade, Frankish pottery, Hellenistic and Roman ceramics, Late Bronze Age stirrup jars, Roman portrait sculpture, early 20th century architectural drawings, Perachora topography, Isthmia, digital archaeology, and educational programs.

Here’s the opening:

“This past summer was hot in Corinth, the hottest I remember since I arrived in 2001. Summers are busy and fascinating, full of discoveries. After the excavations finish at the end of June, the hostel is emptied out and we say our goodbyes to the Regular Member excavators. Their stories of digging are added to the long, long history of generations of excavators. The rooms are filled once again, with a different crew this time. Starting July 1, a wise and stimulating group of people gather in Corinth: professors and researchers who dug different parts of the site come back to make sense of their discoveries.

Our days are spent working in the museum. The short working hours of the museum this year put pressure on resident scholars to work straight through lunch, ‘doing the Mary’ and having a late lunch, which they considered a sacrifice that would please Demeter. Plenty of study and discussion took place in the afternoons in Hill House library and into ouzo time on the terrace overlooking the Corinthian Gulf.”

Read the rest here.

Corinthian Scholarship Monthly (November 2012)

Good Monday morning to you. Here is the latest body of scholarship that went digital last month and came to my attention. If you know of material that should be on the list, feel free to send via email or comment to this post. All of these entries have been added to the Corinthian Studies Digital Library (for info about the library, see this page).

Diachronic

Archibald, Zosia. “Archaeology in Greece, 2011–2012.” Archaeological Reports 58 (2012): 1–121. http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8750918

Archaic-Hellenistic

Hasaki, Eleni. “Craft Apprenticeship in Ancient Greece: Reaching Beyond the Masters.” In Archaeology and Apprenticeship: Body Knowledge, Identity, and Communities of Practice, edited by Willeke Wendrich, 171–202. University of Arizona Press, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=lang_en&id=stwd7aA3QLEC.

Scahill, D. “The South Stoa at Corinth: Design, Construction and Function of the Greek Phase”. PhD Thesis, University of Bath, 2012. http://opus.bath.ac.uk/32294/

Roman

Laurence, Karen A. “Roman Infrastructural Changes to Greek Sanctuaries and Games: Panhellenism in the Roman Empire, Formations of New Identities.” PhD Thesis, University of Michigan, 2012. http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/handle/2027.42/93878.

Medieval

Brown, Amelia R. “Medieval Pilgrimage to Corinth and Southern Greece.” HEROM: Journal on Hellenistic and Roman Material Culture 1 (2012). http://upers.kuleuven.be/en/titel/9789058679284

New Testament

Anderson, R. Dean. “Progymnastic Love.” In Christian Origins and Greco-Roman Culture: Social and Literary Contexts for the New Testament, edited by Stanley E. Porter and Andrew W. Pitts, 1:551–560. Leiden: Brill, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=Ts6ONz6oF0YC.

Coutsoumpos, Panayotis. “Paul, the Corinthians’ Meal, and the Social Context.” In Paul and His Social Relations, edited by Stanley E. Porter and Christopher D. Land, 285–300. BRILL, 2012. http://books.google.com/books?id=l93f7HBMswQC.

Elliott, Neil. “Diagnosing an Allergic Reaction: The Avoidance of Marx in Pauline Scholarship.” The Bible and Critical Theory 8, no. 2 (2012). http://bibleandcriticaltheory.org/index.php/bct/article/viewFile/528/471.

Folarin, George O., and Stephen O. Afolabi. “Christ Apostolic Church Women in Dialogue with 1 Corinthians 14:34-36.” Verbum Et Ecclesia 33, no. 1 (2012). http://www.ve.org.za/index.php/VE/article/view/731.

Harrison, James R. “The Imitation of the ‘Great Man’ in Antiquity: Paul’s Inversion of a Cultural Icon.” In Christian Origins and Greco-Roman Culture: Social and Literary Contexts for the New Testament, edited by Stanley E. Porter and Andrew W. Pitts, 1:214–254. Leiden: Brill, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=Ts6ONz6oF0YC.

Kuwornu-Adjaottor, J.E.T. “Spiritual Gifts, Spiritual Persons, Or Spiritually-Gifted Persons?: A Creative Translation of Twon Pneumatikwon in 1 Corinthians 12:1A.” Neotestamentica 46, no. 2 (2012): 260–273.  http://dspace.knust.edu.gh:8080/jspui/handle/123456789/4601 

Land, Christopher D. “‘We Put No Stumbling Block in Anyone’s Path, so That Our Ministry Will Not Be Discredited’: Paul’s Response to an Idol Food Inquiry in 1 Corinthians 8:1-13.” In Paul and His Social Relations, edited by Stanley E. Porter and Christopher D. Land, 229–284. BRILL, 2012. http://books.google.com/books?id=l93f7HBMswQC.

Lim, Sung Uk. “The Political Economy of Eating Idol Meat: Practice, Structure, and Subversion in 1 Corinthians 8 Through the Sociological Lens of Pierre Bourdieu.” Horizons in Biblical Theology 34, no. 2 (2012): 155–172.  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/brill/hbl/2012/00000034/00000002/art00004 

Moss, Candida R. “Christly Possession and Weakened Bodies: Reconsideration of the Function of Paul’s Thorn in the Flesh (2 Cor. 12:7–10).” Journal of Religion, Disability & Health 16, no. 4 (2012): 319–333. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15228967.2012.731987

Plummer, Robert L., and John Mark Terry, eds. Paul’s Missionary Methods: In His Time and Ours. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2013. http://books.google.com/books?id=6oOVdZUPLGQC.

Porter, Stanley E. “How Do We Define Pauline Social Relations?” In Paul and His Social Relations, edited by Stanley E. Porter and Christopher D. Land, 7–34. BRILL, 2012. http://books.google.com/books?id=l93f7HBMswQC.

Rogers, Guy MacLean. The Mysteries of Artemis of Ephesos: Cult, Polis, and Change in the Graeco-Roman World. Yale University Press, 2012. http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=lang_en&id=CayRIL1ot7cC.

Stenschke, Christoph. “The Significance and Function of References to Christians in the Pauline Literature.” In Paul and His Social Relations, edited by Stanley E. Porter and Christopher D. Land, 185–228. BRILL, 2012. http://books.google.com/books?id=l93f7HBMswQC.

Welborn, Larry L. “Towards Structural Marxism as a Hermeneutic of Early Christian Literature, Illustrated by Reference to Paul’s Spectacle Metaphor in 1 Corinthians 15:30-32.” The Bible and Critical Theory 8, no. 2 (2012). http://bibleandcriticaltheory.org/index.php/bct/article/viewFile/496/469.

The Isthmus and the Consequences of Geography

I returned yesterday evening from the annual meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature and American Academy of Religion. I’ll write more about the  sessions on Roman Corinth tomorrow.

For now, I post below (via my Scribd account) a draft of the paper I gave on the diolkos. As the paper was a summary of recent scholarship, it lacks many footnotes where you might expect them. If you’re interested in pursuing the subject, following the references in footnote two to Lohmann (in press), Koutsoumba and Nakas (in press), and Pettegrew (2011).

Corinthian Scholarship Monthly (Sept 2012)

The latest round up of scholarship relevant to Corinth posted online in the last month.

Archaic-Classical Corinth

Geology and Environment

New Testament

Corinthian Scholarship (monthly): June-August

The second installment of Corinth-related scholarship that went digital in June-August. Happy reading!

Geology

Archaic-Hellenistic

Roman-Late Antique

New Testament and Early Christianity

Medieval and Post-Medieval

Corinthian Scholarship (monthly): March-May

Here is the first installment of Corinth-related scholarship, or scholarship discussing Corinth, which appeared in digital form in March to May. I will post the second installment for June-August on Friday.

[Reposting this at 11:00 as I accidentally deleted the original]

Diachronic

Geology

Archaic-Hellenistic

Roman-Late Antique

New Testament and Early Christian

Medieval and Post-Medieval