Corinthian Scholarship (August 2011)

Archaic-Hellenistic:

Late Antiquity 

New Testament:

Diachronic:

  • Betsey Robinson, Histories of Peirene: A Corinthian Fountain in Three Millennia, Princeton 2011: American School of Classical Studies at Athens.
    • A photo of the cover
    • Here’s the description from the American School of Classical Studies
    • I’ll review the book shortly

Geological and Environmental Studies:

Views from Mt. Oneion

I was twice dragged up to the top of Mt. Oneion, the range that marks the visual southern boundary of the Isthmus.  While Dimitri Nakassis and I were walking survey teams around the plain of the Isthmus in 2000 and 2001, Bill Caraher was driving all over the eastern Corinthia doing “extensive survey” in remote and hard to reach locations.  One spectacular discovery Bill made was a set of fortification walls in one of the saddles of Mt. Oneion dating to both the late Classical and Venetian periods. He published these (with T. Gregory) as Caraher, W. R. and T. E. Gregory. “Fortifications of Mount Oneion, Corinthia,” Hesperia 75 (2006), 327-356.  The abstract to their article:

Recent investigations on the Isthmus of Corinth by the Eastern Korinthia Archaeological Survey (EKAS) have revealed a series of relatively humble fortifications situated along the ridge of Mt.Oneion, which forms the southern boundary of the Isthmus. These Late Classical-Early Hellenistic walls, along with a nearby series of later Venetian fortifications, were designed to block access to the south through several low passes. Controlling the passage of northern armies through the Isthmus to the Peloponnese was clearly a long-term strategic concern for diverse regional powers.

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In 2002 and 2003, I journeyed with Bill and Tim up to the easternmost peaks of Mt. Oneion to document those remains.  The hike was well worth it for it afforded spectacular views of Corinthian territory including the Isthmus, Acrocorinth, and the Saronic coastline.  Views of Kenchreai are especially good.  I have added new gallery pages of those trips to the top of Mt. Oneion:

Thanks to Cindi Tomes of Messiah College’s Faculty Services for scanning these.  I include a few of the highlights below.

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Bill Caraher at the top of the Corinthia.

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Bill takes GPS readings with the Isthmus in the background.

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Saronic coastline along plain of Solygeia.

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I love this view of Kenchreai harbor and Koutsongila

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The Saronic coastline from Kenchreai (bottom-right) to the Bay of Kalamaki (middle-left) to the narrow coastal pass of Gerania (middle-right).

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The Oneion backbone which ends in Acrocorinth (center).

Corinthian Scholarship (July 2011)

Archaic-Hellenistic Corinth

  • D. Obbink and R. Rutherford (eds.), Culture in Pieces: Essays on Ancient Texts in Honour of Peter Parsons, Oxford 2011: Oxford University Press, has several Corinthiaka: a fragment of the archaic poet Eumelus of Corinth, discussions of Pindar’s Thirteenth Olympian and Posidonius of Corinth, a chapter on the Argo adventure
  • J.A. Agnew, J.S. Duncan, and P. Kelly, “Geopolitics,” in The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Human Geography, take the Peloponnesian War as a case study

Roman Corinth:

New Testament

Geology and Geoarchaeology:

Corinthian Scholarship (May-June 2011)

It’s been a couple of months since the last Corinthian Scholarship update, so we have a full list here.  The following list compiles the works I happened to see and the (imperfect) results of various google alerts.  If you have material to add to these monthly compilations, send to corinthianmatters@gmail.com

As usual, 1 and 2 Corinthians scholars win the prize for productivity.

1 and 2 Corinthians:

 

Archaic to Hellenistic Corinth

 

Corinthian Myth and Image:

 

Coastal Archaeology:

 

Miscellany

  • A few from the publication office of the ASCSA:
  • The following books were up for review at the Journal of Roman Archaeology – surely they are taken now.
    • Nancy Bookidis, Corinth volume XVIII.5. The sanctuary of Demeter and Kore. The terracotta sculpture (American School of Classical Studies at Athens; Princeton, NJ 2010). Pp. xxv + 317, pls. 126. ISBN 978-0-87661-185-2. $150.
    • Steven J. Friesen, Daniel N. Schowalter and James C. Walters, Corinth in context: comparative studies on religion and society (Supplements to Novum Testamentum vol. 134; E. J. Brill, Leiden 2010). Pp. xxv + 517, figs. 102, tables 13, maps 3. ISSN 0167-9732; ISBN 978 90 04 18197 7. $230

Corinthian Scholarship (April 2011)

The latest in Corinthian Scholarship for April 2011.  As always, this list is based on various Google alerts that may be thorough but are certainly not exhaustive.  If you have material to add, send it my way.

Geology:

Archaic to Hellenistic:

Roman Corinth:

  • Corinth’s Roman coinage is featured quite frequently in this new book by Constantina Kotsari on The Roman Monetary System

Pauline Corinth, 1 Corinthians, and 2 Corinthians:


Corinthiaka

Some interesting Corinthiaka (Corinthian Matters) for this Wednesday morning:

  • Roy Ciampa and Brian Rosner, authors of a new commentary on 1 Corinthians, talk about St. Paul and Roman sexual ethics in the Corinthian community in a two part video here and here.  Michael Bird’s brief review of their commentary can be found here.
  • A couple of summer conferences related to geology, archaeology, and Early Christianity in the Corinthia.  The theme of the latter is  “Archaeology and Identity in Roman Achaia.”  Looks fantastic.
  • A 17th century Spanish vessel sails through the Corinth canal.
  • The American School of Classical Studies excavations at Corinth featured in a new television series 1821.
  • If you’re an undergraduate interested in a field school in Kenchreai this summer, there are a couple of fellowship opportunities available for member institutions of the Center for Hellenic Studies.
  • Phoebe’s feast day was recently celebrated in the Lutheran and Episcopal church calendar.  A nice piece on Lydia, Dorcas, and Phoebe.
  • So also, in the Orthodox calendar, the 16th century fruitseller and martyr Nicholas of Ichthys of the Corinthia was celebrated on Feb. 14.  An interesting story from the Great Synaxarion of  Christian-Turkish relations in the Ottoman period rediscovered in the early 20th century.